Street Furniture

Sustainable development is one of the key issues of the 21st century. Urban planners are therefore looking into sustainable solutions for street furniture. Stainless steel is a durable, safe, hygienic material and has low maintenance cost. We believe stainless steel is the sustainable solution for street furniture.

More information can be found in this section of the website or on the dedicated website www.street-furniture.org

Stainless Steel New Applications - Street Furniture

The following examples from the ISSF Books of New Applications 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2011 show some of the possible applications with stainless steel in Street Furniture (clicking on the application will open a pdf with more information):

Published: 8/10/2013
Last modified: 8/10/2013

Stainless Steel in Tunnels

Stainless steel is finding increasing use in tunnels for its fire and corrosion resistance properties and long maintenance-free life. ISSF has launched an animation and brochure in the Sustainable Stainless series which provides detailed case studies to demonstrate why stainless steel is becoming the material of choice in road, rail, metro and long sub-sea tunnels.

View the animation here

The brochure is available in Chinese, English, Japanese and Korean [clicking on the language will open the pdf]

Published: 5/7/2012
Last modified: 5/7/2012

Helix Pedestrian Bridge

The Helix Bridge is a landmark pedestrian bridge in Singapore, comprising a walkway surrounded by opposing double helix structures made from stainless steel. The design was inspired by the geometric helicoidal arrangement of DNA, which is seen as a symbol of continuity and renewal. The 280 m long bridge is the first double-helix bridge in the world and forms part of a 3.5 km continuous waterfront promenade, linking the Marina Centre, the waterfront area and a large casino/hotel resort. It is a very lightweight structure built almost entirely using duplex stainless steel.

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Street Furniture website

Sustainability is a key issue for urban planners in the 21st century. One of the most sustainable materials that they can utilise is stainless steel. Durable, beautiful, safe and hygienic, stainless steel provides the ideal solution in a wide range of urban applications - including street furniture. Its low maintenance cost and long-life also make it attractive to public authorities who are seeking economical long-term solutions.

At ISSF, we believe stainless steel is the sustainable solution for street furniture. Our website, www.street-furniture.org, showcases contemporary ideas and examples from around the world. The website describes each application, including details such as location and material supplier. A wealth of additional information is available on request.

The website includes details of the following types of street furniture:

Street seating - Street fencing - Street lighting - Street furniture for traffic and transport - Street art - Other street furniture

Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Stainless Steel for Coastal and Salt Corrosion Applications

This handbook is designed to acquaint the reader with the 300 series stainless steels, particularly grades 304 and 316 and their applications in areas where coastal or salt corrosion is a factor in the life of a metal component.

Source: Specialty Steel Industry of North America

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Emergency Staircase Palazzo della Ragione, Milan, Italy

Following the restoration work on the Palazzo della Ragione on Piazza Mercanti in the 1980s, the capacity of the former "salon" was increased and the old entrance towards the Piazza Duomo re-opened. Fire regulations dictated the construction of an emergency staircase.

Source: Euro Inox

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Stainless Steel for Handrails, Railings & Barrier Applications

Color photographs show unusual handrails and railings in residential and commercial uses, both interior and exterior. Stainless steel barriers and balconies are also shown.

Source: Specialty Steel Industry of North America

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Hong Kong Building Exteriors and Railings

Case study on high urban pollution and moderate coastal salt exposure.

Source: International Molybdenum Association

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Moly Does the Job - Handrails

Molybdenum keeps stainless steel street handrails safe and attractive. This article has been written by an IMOA consultant, Catherine Houska of TMR Stainless.

Source: International Molybdenum Association

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Stainless Steel Tea Staining

The installation in figure 1 depicts the successful use of stainless steel in a coastal environment. After a decade of service in a severe environment it shows little sign of deterioration. The installation in figure 2 however, shows significant staining after only a very brief period in service. This brown tea staining on the stainless steel is avoidable.

Source: Australian Stainless Steel Development Association

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Mobile Stainless Steel WC

Public toilets and washrooms have to be able to cope with frequent use. This is an ideal application for stainless steel, as it is easy to clean and above all hygienic.

Source: Euro Inox

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Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

Which Stainless Steel Should be Specified for Exterior Applications?

The IMOA design evaluation system explains the factors that must be considered when selecting stainless steel for exterior applications. This system helps users select a cost effective stainless steel using a simple scoring system. Case studies from around the world explain instances of good and bad performance using this evaluation system.

Source: International Molybdenum Association

Download pdf in Chinese, English or Spanish

Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012