Human Health Profile

Due to its inherent properties, stainless steel is an ideal material for use in medical, food and water applications which are essential for human health.

Disinfection of stainless steel in hospitals

The continuing safety of using stainless steel in hospital environments has been confirmed in a new study commissioned by Team Stainless. Researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University and AgroParisTech found that there was no discernible difference between the efficiency of disinfection across the range of grades and finishes, and whether or not the stainless steel was new or aged. This confirms the effectiveness of disinfecting stainless steel against bacteria associated with HAIs and its ongoing suitability as a material for use in clinical environments.

A summary brochure, ‘Disinfection of stainless steel in hospitals’ is available to download from the Team Stainless website. Click here.

Published: 9/11/2017
Last modified: 9/11/2017

Safe Food Preparation Using Stainless Steel

The continuing safety of using stainless steel in food preparation has been confirmed in an independent study following the adoption of new test criteria across Europe.

The Council of Europe’s (CoE) guidelines for metals and alloys in food contact materials defines specific release limits (SRLs) for metals and includes a new, more aggressive test to simulate use in food preparation.

The authors demonstrated that all of the grades passed the test for the relevant metallic elements prescribed in the CoE guidelines. A summary of the report can be downloaded at in EnglishChinese or Japanese.

A more detailed technical summary of the report can be downloaded from http://bit.ly/1USTJjn. The full report is also available from http://bit.ly/1Y8gAfd.

Published: 10/11/2015
Last modified: 10/11/2015

Stainless Steel: the Safe Choice

The aim of this paper is to show that stainless steels which have been used in a wide range of applications such as cooking utensils, sinks, food and drink industry equipment, hospital and medical equipment, prothetic human implants, etc. are safe for human health.

Source: Euro Inox

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Using Acids with Stainless Steel

Acids used to etch, pickle or passivate in stainless steel fabrication shops are highly corrosive and, under some circumstances, highly reactive. Where these acids are stored, mixed or used, good occupational health and safety practices need to be implemented.

Source: Australian Stainless Steel Development Association

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Body Piercing with Stainless Steel

The predominant material used for initial piercings in Australia is grade 316L stainless steel. 316L is used for its aesthetic appeal, its ease of fabrication and, most importantly, its established position as an inert and acceptable material for surgical implantation.

Source: Australian Stainless Steel Development Association

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Stainless Steel – A family of Medical Device Materials

This report by Tony Newson first appeared in Medical Advice, Manufacturing & Technology 2002 It reviews the characteristics of the various grades of stainless steel as they relate to the manufacture of medical devices.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Manufacture, Processing and Use of Stainless Steel

The review is, necessarily, a highly technical document, covering a wide range of disciplines. We have therefore prepared the résumé in less technical language. This has been approved by the IOH. The résumé describes the scope and structure of the review, and also includes a précis of the overall conclusions that can be drawn from the findings of the review.

Source: Eurofer

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Stainless Steel - When Health Comes First

Decades of experience have shown that stainless steel is an exceptionally neutral and corrosion resistant material. For this reason, it is normal choice, e.g. in the food industry, in pharmaceutical production or for medical devices. Over the last few years, there has been extensive research into the behaviour of materials in applications that pertain to human health.

Source: Euro Inox

This brochure is available in English and German. Click on the language to download the brochure.

Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Review on toxicity of stainless steel

This study reviews available in vitro and in vivo data, including the metal release data, conducted on stainless steel in order to assess the toxicological relevance of this data to human health, to draw conclusions about the toxicity of stainless steel, and to give recommendations for the classification and labelling of stainless steel according to GHS. Special interest is taken in toxic endpoints like sensitization, respiratory tract toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. The hypothesis of the study has been that the toxicity of stainless steels cannot to be predicted on the basis of the bulk content of individual elements in stainless steel, but, rather, on the basis of the metal release from the stainless steel matrix.

Source: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012