Profile of the Alloying Elements

More information in the form of directives, scientific papers and articles.

Purity of Food Cooked in Stainless Steel Utensils

An extensive program of cooking operations using household recipes, has shown that, apart from aberrant values associated with new pans on first use, the contribution made by 19%Cr/9%Ni stainless steel cooking utensils to chromium and nickel in the diet is negligible. A higher rate of chromium and nickel release in new pans on first use was observed on products from four manufacturers and appears to be related to surface finish, since treatment of the surface of a new pan was partly, and in the case of electropolishing, wholly effective in eliminating their initial high release.

Source: Nickel Institute

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Published: 9/7/2012
Last modified: 9/7/2012

Scientific papers and reports on ion release from stainless steel

Scientific papers and reports on ion release from stainless steels: published and/or submitted (March 2005)

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Ion Release from Stainless Steel

When stainless steel is exposed to a given environment, a key issue from an environmental perspective is the release of small amounts of the main alloying elements iron, chromium, nickel and molybdenum.

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

Applications of Molybdenum in Environmental & Human Health Protection

The Part Played by Molybdenum with Prevention and Minimisation of Pollution * The Influence of Molybdenum in Materials for Containment and Processing of Pollutants * Application of Molybdenum-Containing Nickel Alloys and High Alloy Stainless Steels * Prevention of Pollution.

Source: International Molybdenum Association

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012

European Regulation and Stainless Steel

Presented at the 2003 BSSA conference in Rotherham, this paper discusses the relevance and potential impact of EU hazard-based regulations on stainless steel. The dangers of treating alloys as if they were simple mixtures of their constituents is highlighted.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

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Published: 8/5/2012
Last modified: 8/5/2012