Categories, grades and product forms

In this section more information about the different categories, grades and product forms of stainless steels can be found.

Martensitic Stainless Steels

 Martensitic stainless steels have an excellent strength to weight ratio, strong resistance to corrosion, a good hardness and a wide range of applications, of which the best known are probably knife steels, which are capable of holding a sharp edge.

To provide the right environment for further growth of this range of materials it was necessary to research existing and potential applications, to provide a technical introduction to the material and testimonials from existing producers who have used the material and can talk with authority about its value.

We recommend this brochure to producers, stockists and end-users, with the hope that they will find it a helpful tool for their own market development activities. Click here for downloading this brochure.

Published: 21/11/2017
Last modified: 21/11/2017

The Atlas Steels Technical Handbook of Stainless Steels

A review by Atlas Steels of the grades, properties and processing.

Download here

Published: 6/6/2017
Last modified: 6/6/2017

Austenitic Chromium-Manganese Stainless Steels A European Approach

For Cr-Mn stainless steel to become more acceptable in a European environment, a high level of standardisation is required. Providing technical information has been made a priority, to avoid misunderstanding and improper use.
To respond to these needs, a working group with representatives of the main European flat stainless steel producers was created, under the umbrella of Euro Inox. Its main conclusions are present in this publication.

Download the publication here

Published: 14/12/2015
Last modified: 14/12/2015

Terminology

Navigating the complexities of terminology can be confusing if you don’t have a degree in metallurgy. How are stainless steels and CRAs categorized and graded? What is the difference between a superaustenitic, a superalloy and a nickel alloy? How do all the grading systems gear with one another? This article attempts to guide you through the labyrinth of stainless steel and CRA terminology.

Source: Stainless Steel World, June 2015, www.stainless-steel-world.net

Download here

Published: 11/6/2015
Last modified: 11/6/2015

Practical Guidelines for the Fabrication of High Performance Austenitic Stainless Steels (16001)

In recent years, new highly corrosion-resistant austenitic stainless steels have entered the marketplace. They have demonstrated cost-effective performance in a variety of harsh and corrosive environments. This brochure provides basic information on HPASS grades and compares them to the standard grades. Its primary focus is to compare the fabrication characteristics of the two groups of steels, and to identify similarities and differences between them. This information will help those responsible for fabricating HPASS to manufacture a high-quality product that will perform successfully in the field.

Source: Nickel Institute and International Molybdenum Association

Document available in English and Italian

Published: 29/6/2012
Last modified: 29/6/2012

Stainless Steel Reinforcing Bar

Unlike conventional steel rebar, stainless steel rebar does not corrode and is an ideal solution for harsh environments.

ISSF has several publications on reinforcing bar.

  • A website to raise awareness of the life cycle cost advantages of stainless steel reinforcement bar, compiled by an international group of experts. It provides answers to frequently asked technical questions. Numerous references show how public and private investors have made use of stainless steel reinforcement to enhance the durability of their concrete structures: stainlesssteelrebar.org
  • A flash presentation describing the advantages of using stainless steel rebar. See the animation.
  • A leaflet which answers some basic questions on stainless steel rebar:Why stainless steel reinforcing bar? What are the benefits? Is it cost-effective? Download the leaflet - available in English, Italian and Spanish.
  • Posters that give an overview of the why, when, where and how of stainless steel reinforcing bar. Download the posters - click here to open the pdf

Published: 11/5/2012
Last modified: 11/5/2012

New Guide to Specifying Stainless Steel Long Products

The report highlights a number of benefits of adopting the new EN Standards. These include practical benefits, such as providing clearer product definitions and a simplified ordering system; as well as commercial benefits, including facilitating trade within the European Community and enabling quicker, more reliable and cost effective service from suppliers.

Copies of the report can be obtained from BSSA: enquiry@bssa.org.uk

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Specifier’s Guide to EN Standards for Stainless Long Products

Special BSSA report to provide buyers and specifiers with clear guidelines for specifying stainless long products to the latest European standards.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

Open document here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Tolerances for Cold Rolled Wide Strip

Flat products ( plate sheet coil and strip ) tolerance standards are outlined. These include EN10029 EN10048 EN10051 EN10258 and EN10259. Thickness, width length, flatness, out of square and edge camber tolerances to EN10259 are discussed along with the advantages of the EN tolerance standards.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

Download the article

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Rationale for Using Stainless Steel Reinforcement in the UK Construction Industry

This paper was presented at ISSF-7 conference in May 2003 by Graham Gedge from Arup. The Open Panel Discussion is summarized at the end of the paper.

Download paper here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Stainless Steel is a Winner

Award-winning stainless steel solutions from around the world.

 

View the animation

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Types of Stainless

A summary of the principal characteristics of the popular grades of stainless steels.

Source: Southern Africa Stainless Steel Development Association

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

General Information on Stainless Steels

Article contains a general description of austenitic, ferritic and martensitic grades.

Source: eFunda (engineering Fundamentals)

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Design Guidelines for the Selection and Use of Stainless Steel

Overview of a broad range of stainless steels; their compositions, properties, fabrication and use. Offers guidance on selecting the proper stainless steel by weighing four elements: corrosion or heat resistance; mechanical properties; fabrication operations; and total cost.

Source: Specialty Steel Industry of North America

Open this document

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Grade 316

Topics covered: - Background - Key properties -- Composition -- Mechanical Properties -- Physical Properties -- Grade Specification Comparison -- Possible Alternative Grades - Corrosion Resistance - Heat Resistance - Heat Treatment - Welding - Machining - Dual Certification - Applications

Source: AZoM - The A to Z of Materials

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Stainless Steel – General Information

This extract from the pages of Wikipedia, the web’s free encyclopaedia, contains some general information and an interesting summary of the historical evolution of the iron-chromium alloys.

Source: Wikipedia

Open article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Why is Stainless Steel Stainless?

Article provides a brief description of stainless steel and why it has stainless characteristics.

Source: A. M. Helmenstine PhD

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

200 Series Stainless Steel

Most growth in 200-series use over recent years has been in low-nickel and therefore lowchromium versions which have less corrosion resistance than grade 304. The end result has been corrosion failures in some applications and dissatisfied customers.

Source: Australian Stainless Steel Development Association

Download the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Past, present and future of the duplex stainless steels

The paper presents present also the new trends in alloying duplex grades including the new low alloying grades so-called lean duplex- as well as new grades with specific properties. The extended duplex family with new grades makes it possible to extend the applications areas including in huge markets requiring less corrosion resistance properties than process industry.

Source: ArcelorMittal Stainless

Download the paper here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

What Is Stainless Steel?

A compact 6-page folder has been produced, entitled "What Is Stainless Steel?" Addressed to designers, fabricators and stockholders, it provides a concise summary of the principal families, main properties, commonly available finishes and process routes. Three graphs show how the various austenitic, ferritic and Duplex grades are interrelated and what the alloying elements confer to their technical properties.

Source: Euro Inox

The folder is available in Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish [clicking on the language will open the folder]

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Stainless Steel Grade Selection

Stainless steels have diverse properties which provide viable and cost-effective solutions to a vast range of applications. In practice, development of a hierarchy of required properties reduces the range to a manageable number of highly versatile materials (ASSDA's Reference Manual lists about 30 grades commonly available in Australia), enabling users to choose the most appropriate grade for the particular application.

Source: Australian Stainless Steel Development Association

See the list here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

High Performance Stainless Steel Long Products & Production Process of Stainless Steel

This presentation aims to show the advanced stainless steel grades and process technologies of Daido Steel.

Download the presentation here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Grade Selection Criteria - How to Select Appropriate Grades in Different Business Climates

The presentation by Dr Jacques Charles (Aperam) will outline the different grades and structures covered by the Stainless Steel family. The main properties will be discussed, taking into account their chemistry and structure. The specific properties requested for the main climate business are presented. Material selection guides are presented in order to optimise the material costs. Some new trends concerning material design and applications are provided.

Download the presentation here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Understanding Stainless Steel

A book to help everyone along the supply chain gain a basic understanding of Stainless Steel.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Introduction to Stainless Steel

Stainless steels are corrosion resistant steels with a minimum of 10.5 per cent of chromium (Cr). The ‘family’ or type terms ferritic, martensitic, austenitic and duplex are introduced. The main property of stainless steels, their corrosion resistance, is outlined in addition to other useful properties.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

See the article here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Dos and Donts in Selecting and Specifying Stainless Steel Surface Finishes

This paper, presented at the IOM workshop, So You Want to Build it in Stainless Steel, firstly outlines mill and mechanically polished (brushed) finishes to EN 10088 part 2. It goes on to discuss patterned finishes, bead-blasted finishes and electropolished finishes in a wide range of applications.

Source: British Stainless Steel Association

Download the paper here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Stainless Steel Specialist Course

The ISSF Stainless Steel Specialist Course is designed to improve your knowledge of stainless steel, its properties, performance and uses. It contains interactive e-learning modules for fast, rewarding training.

Whether you’re an engineer, an architect, in stainless steel sales or in manufacturing, the course is essential training for anyone working with stainless steel. The course provides a standard level of knowledge and recognised level of achievement. This means a higher level of understanding of stainless steel for existing and new workers.

For more information on the course click here

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

"New 200-series" steels: An Opportunity or a Threat to the Image of Stainless Steel?

This technical booklet contains a guide to chrome-manganese austenitic stainless steels and advice for potential users. The guide has been produced by the ISSF Committee on Market Development, and approved by the ISSF Board of Directors.

The booklet is available in English and Chinese [clicking on the language will open the pdf]

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

The Ferritic Solution

Ferritic stainless steels share most of the mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties of their more expensive cousins, austenitic stainless steels. However, unlike the austenitics, ferritic stainless steels contain no nickel. This makes them a cost-effective alternative in many applications.

The Ferritic Solution provides an overview of the properties of ferritic stainless steels, the advantages of using them and the applications where they can be used. The Ferritic Solution is a crucial reference document for stainless steel users, specifiers and producers.

This brochure is available in Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish and Turkish [clicking on the language will open the pdf].

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012

Basic Facts about Stainless Steel

What is stainless steel?

Stainless steel is the generic name for a number of different steels used primarily for their resistance to corrosion. The one key element they all share is a certain minimum percentage (by mass) of chromium: 10.5%.

Open further information in PDF format

Published: 4/5/2012
Last modified: 4/5/2012